Beware The 16 Signs Of Aging

 

If any of these problems are already visible and they bother you, place a check mark next to them. These are the issues to which you might want to consider giving a little extra care, in addition to following a good skin-care regimen and leading a healthy lifestyle. This way, we can fine-tune the precise plan of attack that will be the most effective for you. 

The visible 16 signs of aging

Dryness. The skin’s oil glands reduce their production significantly after about age 30, and the loss continues over the years.

Enlarged pores. Some people are predisposed to having enlarged pores and others are blessed with non-existent pores, but in both cases the loss of the skin’s underlying support system causes them to open up even more with age.

Sun damage/loss of skin tone. Melanocytes begin to burn out when you reach your late 30s and 40s, reducing the skin’s ability to fight sun damage and often causing uneven pigmentation.

Loss of skin elasticity. The loss of collagen and elastin are largely to blame for the appearance of wrinkles, but a lot of dynamic expressions – in the form of smiling, frowning and squinting – contribute as well.

Thinning. At about age 40, the dermis and the skin’s fat layer begin to thin. The process picks up steam after your 50th birthday. The unhappy result: sagging and the loss of the plump, youthful softness. The loss of the fat layer also makes the skin more fragile and likely to abrade.

Frown lines, lines on the forehead and from the nose to the mouth. As the skin ages and collagen breaks down, the skin will yield to the pulling force whenever you smile or frown and develop a wrinkle along the pulling force of the muscle.

Increased healing time. Our healing time begins to increase once we reach our 30s, with epidermal regeneration taking twice as long in our 70s and 80s as it did in our earlier years. The result is not only a dulled complexion, but also a longer wound-healing process.

Loss of firmness. In the dermis, cells called fibroblasts constantly replenish our skin’s supply of collagen and elastin. Fibroblasts lose their ability to function over the years, resulting in the reduction of collagen and elastin.

Broken capillaries. These fine red lines appear most frequently on the cheeks and nose, and they’re due to the proliferation of many tiny broken capillaries.

Dark discolorations/pigmentation spots. Hyperpigmentation is one of the first signs of aging. Sun-induced skin discoloration begins in the late teens and early 20s and get continually worse.

Reduced ability to repair damage. Overall, the body loses its ability to repair free-radical damage, so changes in the cells become more pronounced, accelerating aging.

Wrinkles. At age 30, collagen and elastin start to lose their strength, leaving the skin with some wrinkling.

Loss of fat. It’s the loss of fat under the eyes and in the cheeks that gives rise to a hollowed, aged look.

Eye wrinkles or crow’s-feet. When we reach our late 30s, little folds of soft skin have turned into sharp-edged lines around the eyes. However, once we enter 40s, most of us develop lines around the eyes that remain visible even when our faces are still. 

Sallow, dull or lack of radiance skin. When we’re in our 20s and 30s, our skin exfoliates well even by itself, giving us the pinkish, radiant glow of new skin cells. But as we age, the exfoliating process slows down dramatically. 

Sagging around the jaw and neck. A sagging jawline happens because of a combination of thinning skin, loss of subcutaneous fat, loss of muscle bulk, and loss of bone in the cheek and jaw. The 90º between the neck and the chin is also lost as we age for the same reasons, plus the fact that the muscles and tendons in the neck change consistency and are less able to follow the chinline.

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